Cork Photo presents the first in a series of photobook exhibitions.
Venue: Cork Photo Gallery.
Dates: July 1st – July 31st 2016.

Jan McCullough Home Instruction Manual

Jan McCullough
Home Instruction Manual

Jan McCullough – Home Instruction Manual

Traditionally, instruction manuals have been the perfect source for practical solutions. Experts in specific subjects provide written authority on how to repair faults and carry out tasks from scratch. I typed ‘how to make a home’ into Google, and was directed to an online chat forum in which self-described experts were exchanging detailed instructions.

I rented an ordinary suburban house and carried out the strangers’ advice exactly over the period of two months. In complying with the instructions for making the perfect home, I contemplated the construction of an identity from scratch. The following photographs document the end result of my time living and working in the house, trying on different lives for size.

janmccullough.co.uk

Yvette Monahan The Time of Dreaming the World Awake

Yvette Monahan
The Time of Dreaming the World Awake

Yvette Monahan – The Time of Dreaming the World Awake

Yvette Monahan is a Dublin based Photographer who works with myths and landscape. She is interested in how a particular landscape can hold stories of what’s been and what could be. Her body of work The Time of Dreaming the World Awake won the Portfolio Award at PhotoIreland 2013.

This body of work was also chosen to represent the Belfast Photo Festival at the Circulations Festival in Paris in February 2014.The book dummy of The Time of Dreaming the World Awake was nominated in January 2014 for MACK publishing’s First Book Award by Christiane Monarchi of Photomonitor.

yvettemonahan.com

Ciarán Óg Arnold I went to the worst of bars hoping to get killed. but all I could do was to get drunk again,

Ciarán Óg Arnold
I went to the worst of bars hoping to get killed.
but all I could do was to get drunk again,

Ciarán Óg Arnold – I went to the worst of bars hoping to get killed. but all I could do was to get drunk again.

I went to the worst of bars hoping to get killed. but all I could do was to get drunk again is a diary of sorts, following invisible men, down piss alleyways and into empty bars. The photographer accompanies the seekers of oblivion, their lopsided faces caught between ecstasy and apathy, their mouths chasing the numbness of inebriation. This is Ballinasloe, a sandstone town on the River Suck in the easternmost corner of Galway in Ireland, seen through the eyes of a native, Ciarán Óg Arnold.Within the rabble, Arnold trails after the cast-offs, invisible men who spend their time in murky corners, choosing to do nothing but drift and drink. Ballinasloe is a mouth; in Irish, mouth of the ford, mouth of the crowds. “We claim to hate it here”, writes Arnold, “but the truth is that we choose to stay, hiding from reality, drowning in drink and wanting to be left alone as we await whatever fate is in store.”

ciaranogarnold.com

Eamonn Doyle End.

Eamonn Doyle
End.

Eamonn Doyle – End.

Created as both installation and publication, End. is a collaborative work by Eamonn Doyle, Niall Sweeney and David Donohoe. Built around the photographs of Doyle, it also features drawing and sound by Sweeney and Donohoe.

End. gives equal significance to the city and its population, their combined forces continuously shaping each other. Individual journeys of everyday life are compacted repetitively into the same streets.  Dubliners wear away at the autonomy of their city, while the streets themselves become a kind of sculptural civic mental State. Dublin, its light and its people, carry out dance-like actions, swapping roles in a series of short plays. End. unfolds as a sequence of events — loops of time and place — revealing a city whose concrete is as plastic as the movement of its inhabitants.

eamonndoyle.com

Dragana Jurisic YU: The Lost Country (2011-2013)

Dragana Jurisic
YU: The Lost Country (2011-2013)

Dragana Jurisic – YU: The Lost Country (2011-2013)

Yugoslavia fell apart in 1991. With the disappearance of the country, at least one million five hundred thousand Yugoslavs vanished, like the citizens of Atlantis, into the realm of imaginary places and people. Today, in the countries that came into being after Yugoslavia’s disintegration, there is a total denial of the Yugoslav identity. “There proceeds steadily from that place a stream of events which are a source of danger to me,” wrote the Anglo-Irish writer, Rebecca West in 1937. “That place” was Yugoslavia, the country in which I was born. Realizing that to know nothing of an area “which threatened her safety” was “a calamity”, she embarked on a journey through Yugoslavia.

The result was Black Lamb and Grey Falcon. Initially intended as “a snap book” it spiraled into half a million words, a portrait not just of Yugoslavia, but also of Europe on the brink of the Second World War, and widely regarded as one of the masterpieces of the 20th century.

draganajurisic.com

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